Alina Raulinaitis, Ottawa community development intern, presented a village land use map that she researched and produced for the village. Raulinaitis will complete her internship on Aug. 1. (Putnam Sentinel/Anne Coburn-Griffis)
Alina Raulinaitis, Ottawa community development intern, presented a village land use map that she researched and produced for the village. Raulinaitis will complete her internship on Aug. 1. (Putnam Sentinel/Anne Coburn-Griffis)
OTTAWA — Following action taken at Monday’s Village of Ottawa regular meeting of council, a new member took his seat on council, a new, working ladder truck will soon join the fire department’s fleet and a camera system will troll the depths of the village’s sewers.

Council accepted the resignation of Dave Michel from the Ottawa Volunteer Fire Department. Minutes later, Michel took the oath of office so that he could take his seat at the council table. Michel replaces former council member Jeff Ducey who resigned on June 9. One of Michel’s first votes was on the 2015 budget for the village following a public hearing at 8:10 p.m. The budget passed with no changes.

The fire department itself is that much closer to having an approved, working ladder truck in its fleet of emergency vehicles. Council voted to authorize Mayor Dean Meyer’s and Clerk-Treasurer Barb Hermiller’s signatures on loan documents towards the purchase of a Smeal fire truck. Ottawa Fire Chief Dan Rieman told council that, following his inspection of the vehicle which is located in Huntsville, Alabama, the dealer has replaced the transmission, a value of $14,350. Rieman said the transmission’s warranty will transfer to the Village of Ottawa. A new seat will also be added to the main cab. Rieman anticipates that the new ladder truck will be delivered to Ottawa no later than the beginning of August.

Council heard the third reading of Ordinance #14-10, one authorizing the purchase of a Chevy 350 DRW cutaway mounted mainline TV inspection system base unit. Simply put, the equipment is a camera that will move through Ottawa’s sewer system, allowing the village to address the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requirement to clean, inspect, combat and correct the infiltration of river water into Ottawa’s wastewater treatment system. Up to this point, the village contracted the use of a camera.

The purchase of the camera and the hiring of two new full-time employees who, in addition to other duties, would operate the equipment, has been a controversial issue in council. A move to suspend the rules that required three public readings of the ordinance and pass it on emergency failed to receive the necessary number of member votes at the June 2 council meeting.

“I have one final question,” asked Meyer. “Is this the camera we want?”

Ottawa Wastewater Director Doug Schroeder confirmed. On Monday night, the ordinance passed five-to-one in favor of the camera’s purchase in the amount of $172,090.26.

Other council business included:

• an internship overview provide by community development intern Alina Raulinaitis;

• consideration of 2015 financial commtitment to the Blanchard River Watershed Partnership;

• passage of a resolution accepting a proposal in the amount of $8,625 from All Purpose Contracting, Inc. to repair the stone walking path around the water treatment plant reservoir.